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Animated video gives young people Headstart against brain injury

Our $65,000 grant is dedicated to educating young people about the realities of life after a brain injury

Wednesday, 7 June, 2017.

Newcastle’s Headstart Acquired Brain Injury Service’s team dedicated to educating young people about the realities of life after a brain injury will be able to spread its message to a wider community with the help of our $65,000.

The 30 year-old not-for-profit has used the grant to create a dynamic animated educational video ‘What your head is not’ and purchase a vehicle to transport its Community Education Team throughout the Hunter region’s schools, workplaces and community facilities.

Headstart Executive Director, Sue McHattie said the funding would help its educators, who have sustained an Acquired Brain Injury, to better engage with young people to share their first-hand experiences and advice about avoiding, recovering from and living with brain injuries.

“One of Headstart’s core services is community information and education to help raise awareness of the most common causes and life-long impacts of acquired brain injuries, hopefully helping to avoid preventable life-changing injuries,” Sue said.

“Our Community Education team in the past has needed to travel significant distances to deliver presentations with basic materials, and we have long needed a creative and engaging video,” she said “The grant from the Newcastle Permanent Charitable Foundation will ensure that our team has a reliable vehicle and really engaging education tools.”

HeadStart Newcastle image
Headstart Newcastle
Headstart Acquired Brain Injury Service... What Your Head Is Not.

“The Foundation is proud to support a program which delivers an important message to young people and has the potential to save many people from sustaining a brain injury to be conscious of reducing behaviours which place them at greater risk”

Newcastle Permanent Charitable Foundation Chairman, Phil Neat congratulated the Headstart team on its commitment over the past 30 years. “The Foundation, when assessing the Headstart grant application, recognised that its team is extremely dedicated, which has shown in its commitment to delivering educational and support programs which until now had limited financial support, fuelled mainly by the passion and experience of its volunteers.”

“The Foundation is proud to support a program which delivers an important message to young people and has the potential to save many people from sustaining a brain injury to be conscious of reducing behaviours which place them at greater risk,” he said.

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